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Britain is looking at range of options to put pressure on internet companies to do more to take down extremist material, Security Minister Ben Wallace said on Sunday.

The government has previously complained technology companies are not doing enough to tackle the use of their networks both to promote extremist ideology and for communication between militant suspects.

“We are going to look at the range of options. We have seen the Germans have proposed perhaps a fine, we are not sure whether that is going to work but there are range of pressures we can put on to some of these companies,” Wallace told BBC Television.

“We think they have the technology and the capability to change the algorithms they use,” he said, adding that one issue was the way the companies linked posts to other similar material online.

Wallace said some companies were “being difficult” but there was evidence that others were trying to improve their work on the issue.
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Police patrol the secure area outside the Manchester Arena

Members of Manchester suicide bomber Salman Abedi’s network are still potentially at large, British interior minister Amber Rudd said on Sunday, after the terrorism threat level was lowered due to significant progress in the investigation.

Police have said they have arrested a large part of the network behind the bombing, which killed 22 people at a concert hall, and two more men were arrested on Saturday as police continued to close in on the group.

Asked during an interview on BBC television whether some of the group were still at large, Rudd said: “Potentially. It is an ongoing operation. There are 11 people in custody, the operation is still really at full tilt in a way.”

Prime Minister Theresa May said developments in the investigation into the bombing meant intelligence experts had decided to lower the threat level from its highest rating “critical”, meaning an attack could be imminent, to “severe”.

Police have issued a photograph of Abedi, a 22-year-old Briton born to Libyan parents, taken on Monday night before he blew himself up and said they believed he had assembled his bomb in an apartment in the city centre.

British officials have confirmed he had recently returned from Libya and the officers said police needed information about his movements from May 18 when he returned to Britain.

Abdedi was known to British security services before the bombing, the government has said, but Rudd declined to comment on exactly what had been known about him.

Media have reported that people who knew Abedi had raised concerns about him and his views as long ago as five years before he carried about Monday’s attack.

“The intelligence services are still collecting information about him but I wouldn’t rush to conclusions, as you seem to be, that they have somehow missed something,” Rudd said.
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President of  France Emmanuel Macron

 A French national who had been kidnapped at the start of March in Democratic Republic of Congo has been freed, according to a statement from the office of French President Emmanuel Macron.

"The president of the republic welcomes the news of the liberation of our compatriot kidnapped on March 1 in the east of Democratic Republic of Congo," Macron's statement said.

Macron also thanked the Congo authorities for their work in helping to free the hostage.

Earlier in March, France had said that a group of workers had been kidnapped at a mine run by Banro Corp.
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Libyan Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, a group linked to Al-Qaeda, is formally dissolving itself, it said in a statement on Saturday.

The group, which Washington says was behind the 2012 Benghazi attack that killed the U.S. ambassador Christopher Stevens, had been at war with Khalifa Haftar's eastern-based Libyan National Army.

The group said its decision came on the back of heavy losses that have wiped out its leadership and decimated its fighters, according to the statement.

Forces aligned with the Libyan National Army have skirmished since late last year with opponents aligned with a U.N.-backed Government of National Accord (GNA) in Tripoli.

Groups such as Ansar al-Sharia, which had tried to maintain a stronghold in the country's east, have inserted themselves into the larger war, creating a fractious battleground overlaid by a multitude of militias.

The group's statement called on revolutionary forces and shoura councils in Benghazi to unite in order to form a united front.